Seize Their Moment: Experiencing the Full Lifecycle of Candidate Experience

Seize Their Moment: Experiencing the Full Lifecycle of Candidate Experience

Mike Roberts

With so much information at our fingertips, it rarely makes sense today to make a decision without first consulting the internet. Review sites, search engines, social media—the number of resources available are growing by the day. The process of searching for a job has extended into this realm. Companies are now getting more scrutiny as well as praise for their candidate experience, employer brand, and more.

The next chapter in our “Seize Their Moment” series explores candidates’ relationship with the internet and how they use it during the job search process. As our fictional characters, Nick and Zoey, near the end of their searches, remember to consider their stories through the lens of your own candidate experience.

In case you missed the previous parts of this story: read them here. Also, if you’re heading to HR Tech this October, don’t forget to swing by the Jibe booth to see Nick and Zoey in action.

Chapter 5: The End Is Near (Or Is It?)

Nick

A major challenge with blindly applying to dozens of positions at once is keeping track of them all. Most companies never respond, and then the ones that do typically have to automate any communication until recruiters get a chance to review the resumes. Nick was getting frustrated feeling like he’d entered into this unwinnable online job application lottery. Though, that changed when he got a call one day during work.

Someone with an unknown number left a message on Nick’s phone while he was in a meeting with his obnoxious boss, Vance Jones. For over an hour, Vance had been breaking apart Nick’s project plan, prolonging the product update that had been slated to be released two weeks prior. At that point, Nick was basically ignoring Vance’s rudely put suggestions, now counting down the minutes until the meeting he was over.

He listened to the message. It was from a recruiter at an agency, but she didn’t mention the position or the company. So, Nick went out in front of the building to call her back. Her client, Northway Analytics, was hiring an analytics manager. And although Nick hadn’t heard of the company, he was happy to hear back from someone. Thinking he seemed more than qualified, she set up a phone interview with the head of product.

Nick was feeling elated as he went through the rest of his workday. Everything seemed to be moving in the right direction with the phone interview set for later in the week. He went home that night with intentions on learning everything he could about the company. Unfortunately, that turned out to be an unfulfilling exercise. Their website looked like it was from the late ‘90s and their Twitter account had been inactive since 2010.

Worse, though, Northway Analytics had a Glassdoor rating of 2.1 stars out of 5. Their CEO had a 34% approval rating. And only 42% of people would recommend working there to a friend. It seemed like a horrible place to get a job. Following his gut, Nick decided to email the outsourced recruiter and cancel the interview. He just said, “Thanks for thinking of me, but I don’t think this opportunity is going to work out.”

Nick was feeling quite defeated but decided to pull out his iPad and continue on with the job search. He went back to a job board, looking for anything new since late last week. There was one position that stood out. He pulled up the description, hit apply, and was then met with an error. He couldn’t apply from a tablet. That was the last straw. “Why is it so hard to apply for a job in 2015?” he said out loud.

Nick put down his iPad and decided he would just continue working at Rapid Financial for the time being, despite how terrible it was.

Zoey

Happy with applying to lots of jobs two weekends before, Zoey was patiently waiting to hear back. She was optimistic, more-so than at the beginning of her search. Having to go to the library because she was a mobile-only internet user was a bit disheartening, but it was better than getting an error when she tried to apply from her phone. The library near her house wasn’t nice at all—she was hoping she’d never have to return.

As another few days went by, her patience was starting to run out. She was tired from having to work almost 55 hours over the course of six shifts the week before, on top of taking her mom to physical therapy whenever she could. For the second week in a row, she hadn’t heard anything beyond an auto-reply, so she decided perhaps she would apply to more jobs in the meantime. Only this time, she didn’t want to go to the library.

When Zoey first started working, every retailer accepted in-store applications. Now, most preferred online applications and that was turning out to be a problem. She didn’t want to waste any more time getting errors when she got to the application stage of her search, so she thought maybe she’d go to an internet café—if those things still existed. A quick Google search confirmed there was one still operating in Queens.

On her day off, she went to the café, Gao Xing Net. The front half of the establishment was an Asian noodle shop, while the back half had eight older-looking tower PCs behind a bulletproof glass window and door. It was going to cost Zoey $4 an hour to use a computer but she figured it’d be worth it. She spent the next five hours applying to more jobs, experiencing the usual variety of good and bad experiences.

Overall, it cost Zoey $20 to apply for eight jobs. It seemed wrong that she had to pay to try to conduct her job search, especially since the companies she was applying to were some of the biggest retail chains in the world. Zoey wasn’t a very technical person, but she used services like Uber, Amazon, and Google, and was used to everything being so easy on her phone. The disconnect with the job search process was confusing.

When she was done applying, she hurried off to meet her mom at physical therapy. Zoey was already running late, but her mom knew she was doing the best she could.

Subscribe to the Jibe blog to get notified about the next chapter in Nick and Zoey’s journey.

Interested in learning more about what it takes to build a modern candidate experience? Check out our new “9-Point Checklist for Building a Next-Generation Candidate Experience.”

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